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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 342 (some duplicates have been removed)
the need outside the elevator using current technology and we learn about the latest destination elevated technology all here in san francisco. we will also visit the machinery where all the behind- the-scenes gears control these incredible machines. we are very fortunate today to have an expert with those who is going to walk us are around elevators in san francisco. can you tell us about the history of elevators in san francisco? the measure -- >> sure. the history of elevator technology evolves with the city. first elevators were installed for moving materials in the 1860's. in the 1870's, the first passenger elevator was installed, and that allowed building heights to go up to about seven floors. starting in the 18 eighties, 1890's, the first electric elevators were installed. that allowed for buildings to go up even higher, even more than 10 floors, and those were the first elevators that became representative of what we consider modern elevators today. >> so the height of buildings is related to elevator technology. >> both of these technologies encourage architects to build taller
at the programs, traveling around the world, that there is one constant. there are people and technology that say this is a place they want to be. entrepreneurs say this is where they want to be. when companies like facebook are started at an institution like harvard and a pier, you start to recognize why this is so special and fiber and why innovation is a bleeding heart economy. so let me try to give some brief introductions about our panel today. i have to confess, i only just met one of our panelists, lee said dyson, the ceo of coverity. she got a ph.d. in physics from mit but felt the urge to come out here to california and she did her research at stanford and lawrence berkeley. that is an indication we are getting smart people like her out to california to start companies like hers. 15 employees in 2008. it is interesting, we talk about cloud computing and these technology companies, but she takes electronic waste that is rich in carbon and recycles that into oil for plastics and a variety of other things. i wish i had more time to talk to you and get to know you because i am sure there's a
of technology to sit in on the group. >> it might be worth while to let them know. >> good. >> okay. >> actually, additional state quarter meetings are going to be held subsequently and they will be involved in the testing and review and feedback of the citizen portal so that is going to occur. do you have any questions on this subject? >> good job. >> okay. >> keep it moving. >> yeah. this is going to go ahead and talk about the technology project. >> yeah. >> so the several of them that are critical but the most critical one is the infrastructure refresh which is the improvement. the proposal was submitted two years ago to the college, which of the committee and information technology to revamp our service this is about 7 years old. and we started this process two years ago, the city export and the city on committee of technology over sees the technology projects in the city and they do and were pushing for consolidation, as a result of that, actually, we were approved to go ahead and do the refresh of the infrastructure in conjunction with the planning department as well as the human services
, the fascinating thing about technology businesses in the internet is that a company can become a global brand and get global reach in a stunningly quick period of time. that's what e-bay did in its first five to ten years. he became a global phenom in a stunningly short period of time. just as you can disrupt, you can be disrupted. ebay when i got there was beginning to be disrupted itself. >> charlie: by? the way disruption happens it doesn't come directly at you. product search didn't exist when ebay started. google had started. craigslist had started. what we needed to do was to face up to the reality of the change and in essence reinvent e-bay with today's tech, what was today's technology and internet and reimagine, reinvent the company. >> charlie: did some people come to you and say if you do this you're going to cannibalize what we have. >> absolutely. at some point you have to choice. the dilemma in technology is either you cannibalize yourself or someone else is going to do it. we took the tough medicine labeled it a turn around. no one liked it at first. that allowed us to focus on
been working with us, with sf city as i mentioned earlier, spur, our department of technology, our committee on information technology, and then we have an open data working group which really tries to get volunteers from the different departments to work together and see what other kinds of data analytics that we could provide to the public. >>> i want to just say today, you're going to hear some demonstration projects that are already started with our open data. again, as a way to celebrate innovation month, not only are we opening up different companies throughout san francisco, but we want to also encourage, examples we're going to be announcing yoyo working with phil ginsberg to provide data where are small parks or where the events are happening. what is the cost? how to get there in the hours that they're operating? a smart phone application for all of our events in recreation and park department, that to me is going to be invaluable to visitors and to our neighborhoods. bronwin who is working with us on data information from neighborhoods in our city, growth trends, that ki
? is there a bubble? >> i would like to speak about the clean technology sector. there was a little bit of a bubble that emerged in 2005, 2006, 2007 time frame. what has happened since then is you see the landscape changed. there have been a lot of companies and vc's, founders, that are focused on very few investments in companies but are in it for the long run. the time and invested it takes to build a clean tech company. the difference with clean tech, there might be large facilities required, investment to build your first plant, for instance. we are seeing a change in the landscape. one thing i want to add, too, for clean tech, there are organizations like the clean tech opened that foster innovation and identify and help on to produce with that system, present their idea, put together their business plan, attract the mentors and advisers to help them build their technology. the incubators are contributing to a maturing clean tech and biotech sector -- sector. >> just a short comment. we focus in this building, a research center, on technology. some of it is near term, some of it is very long t
to me a technology geek's really dream, is to have all of this data available so that we can mine them in different ways and very creative ways. and i want to say, again, as someone who has worked in government for 23 years, i've been at those departments like dpw and others where we think in one dimension. this is where we clean the streets. this is how often we clean it. this is when we tell the cars to move off. and this is what dpw does and it does it pretty well within that constraint. if you shared that data with companies who are looking at where do people live, how -- what their patterns are, we can get a lot more creative. when we open our data, when we suggest to departments that they can work in collaboration, when we open up and establish within our city contracts that the companies that do service for us do not own the data that they generate from us, that they will have a contractual obligation to share that with the city so that we can mine that to the rest of the city, that's advance of opportunities for everybody. i know at the heart of sharing this data, there is goin
their business plan, attract the mentors and advisers to help them build their technology. the incubators are contributing to a maturing clean tech and biotech sector -- sector. >> just a short comment. we focus in this building, a research center, on technology. some of it is near term, some of it is very long term. i am glad to hear what we suggest said. i worry personally that we do not see as many long term investments as we used to. >> how do you define a long-term investment? >> good question. so, i think the question is, how speculative is this? i will use us as an example. we have a team in this building working on lithium batteries. their goal is to build a battery with 500 miles of range, for obvious reasons. we hope they will have a prototype in the feet next few years. we think -- in the next few years. we think the stars are lined up. that is a long-term investment. >> next question to all of you. michael, we will start with you. we know government is the regional -- at the regional, state, and local level can help or hinder startup companies. what would you like to see from
are right behind me. to some of the leading technology companies in the valley. we have companies that raise anywhere from a thousand dollars to $25 million that have sort of been housed with us. some of the coolest things that have happened at the hatchery two people sitting next to each other working on the same app for six months decided to merge and raise a million dollars for their company. so, collaborative consumption is something we truly believe in and having spent a couple of years working with the likes of jane, brian, tina lee and a bunch of other people who have been sort of working on this open data problem, it's been sort of exciting to sort of see it come to fruition today and see sort of the progress that they've made. so, for me this is sort of -- it's been fun to sort of watch this team of people come together and do what they do and make san francisco a 21st century city. so, you know, it's an honor to welcome the mayor back to the hatchery, the new hatchery. we invite you, supervisor chiu, to our monthly infamous happy hours where bourbon and branch caters to meet with o
to innovation. >>> 13 years ago, i like all of you started a company. i started in i-ti a technology company in the 1.0 world. it was a company that created technology to connect citizens better with government * . i ran it for almost nine years. and when i was elected to office four years ago, i was unfortunately more surprised than i wanted to be about how far behind san francisco government was. this was very 2008, 2009. with you i'm really proud of the leaps and bounds we have taken as a city * . i was proud in 2010 to help move forward legislation to really bring together city departments to work in a coordinated way with our committee on information technology. to help create a chief information officer position for the city. i was also proud to work with then mayor newsome in passing the first generation of open data legislation that we have. but as our civil grand jury in june pointed out, our i-t in san francisco is still in need of a culture shock. and this is where all of us come in today. we have 200 data sets that have already been put out there, but by and large the data sets p
, with water that are not always proven technologies, but they're things that are enough proven you should take a bit of a risk and you should show others it can be done. >> we're showing the world, suddenly had wind turbines which they didn't have before. so, our team realizing that time would change, and realizing where the opportunities were today, we said, you know what, we started out as really something to control wind as an asset, when you combine today's technology becomes something entirely different. >> wind turbines in an urban environment is a relatively new concept. there are a few buildings in other major cities where they have installed wind turbines on the roof. and wind turbines in buildings are effective. >> the discussion was do we do that or not? and the answer was, of course. if they're not perfect yet, they're building a building that will last 100 years. in 100 years someone is going to perfect wind efficient turbines. if these aren't right, we'll replace them. we have time to do that. >> the building that's two renewable energy generations. wind turbines located on the n
of the worst technology in government. and over the last few years we have worked really hard to improve that park user's experience through the use of technology. and i want to start out before we talk a little about the app saying a if you thank yous. i really want to thank mayor lee to his incredible commitment to technology and frankly the recreation and park department. i want to thank supervisor chiu who has been a leader both in the parks world and in the technology world. sf city has really been a driving force behind helping government think about new ways, new and improved ways maybe for some of you they're old ways now. but new and improved ways for government to reach users of our programs and services. and i want to say the last special thank you to the folks from apple-liscious. this thing is awesome. this past year, the trust for public land which is a national parks organization determined that san francisco, which has 4,000 acres of open space and over 220 parks, over 15% of the city's land is open space. the trust for public land said we have the best urban park system
, stormwater development -- these are independent technologies. but what came first, most often, was a water supply system. the basic system is essentially the same as we used back in the 19th century. and in some cases, some of the same pipes. grusheski: philadelphia was the first american city to develop a water system and to take on as a municipal responsibility water delivery to all of its citizens. when william penn laid out the city, he actually chose a spot of land that had a lot of groundwater. however, by 1730, 30,000 people lived within the first seven blocks of philadelphia, next to the delaware river. well, 30,000 people caused filth in the city and polluted their water sources. the groundwater was not potable. and in one year, 1/6 of the population died of yellow fever. now, they didn't know at the time that yellow fever was carried by mosquitoes. but the health issue was major in that first movement to build a water system. narrator: so they set out to find the cleanest source of water. although the majority of philadelphia's water now comes from the delaware river, early engin
they may effect you. learn how technology is changing the world of forecasting. ús >> terry: san francisco bay area is highly vulnerable to severe weather and earthquakes. so we have cleared one place where you can find all the resources and tips you need to be prepared. visit abc7news.com/preparenorcal and learn how you can keep you and your family safe. >> climate change seems to have come upon us so suddenly. even though scientists were telling us 40 years ago we could expect the kinds of extreme weather conditions we have seen globally in the last five to ten years. it was almost four years ago, what human beings are put go into the atmosphere we can expect these climate patterns. we are seeing higher global temperatures year after year. we are seeing more frequent and extreme storms. >> being a communicator, you want to be fair and open, you don't want to worry people or steer people. you know people are smart. they know about their weather and climate. they know that it is changing. >> certainly i think on a global scale we have seen temperatures rising over the past few decades. the
who live there and using technology do it and so but think about all of the townhall meetings in the past where we try to engage citizen for meetings a lot of time they are sparsely attainable tended people have commits to work on whether it's working or taking kids to soccer but this project is a revolutionary idea in that it's combining the meetings on the ground with people there and engaging technology so people are putting their feedback online and real-time with the community members that are not in attendance might be thinkings and after meetings we are able to have people see and improve their ideas on neighborhood in addition, to having big posters directly on site in a location and it has been a tremendous effort to watch the community come together on it and a lot of times, people think of the sunset and how quiet and sleepy the evident is and i have to say this effort has rejuvenated the area and gotten a lot of people involved in it and so we are pleased po to be here and honor the people in it and so daniel is homesick so he is not here to say how proud he is on
winters. a look at changing weather patterns and how they may effect you. learn how technology is changing the world of forecasting. ♪ i'd like to thank eating right, whole grain, multigrain cheerios! my bowl, my spoons! mom, are those my jeans? [ female announcer ] people who choose more whole grain tend to weigh less than those who don't. multigrain cheerios has whole grain and 110 delicious calories. ...more grains. less you! multigrain cheerios in multi-grain cheerios peanut butter. >> terry: san francisco bay area is highly vulnerable to severe weather and earthquakes. so we have cleared one place where you can find all the resources and tips you need to be prepared. visit abc7news.com/preparenorcal and learn how you can keep you and your family safe. >> climate change seems to have come upon us so suddenly. even though scientists were telling us 40 years ago we could expect the kinds of extreme weather conditions we have seen globally in the last five to ten years. it was almost four years ago, what human beings are put go into the atmosphere we can expect these climate patterns. w
. plus. >> i'm scott budman in time for valentine's day. technology and romance. how one company uses social networking and lots of languages to find success. and it's that time of year, the celebrities are out, where you can star gaze along the coast this weekend. >> and good afternoon, i'm jeff ranieri in the nbc weather center, we are tracking changes, the storm system is off shore, we will give you the time line and if you are headed anywhere near the sierra, winter weather advisory in effect, 3-6 inches possible there. i have more on your full forecast in a few. >> a failed drug deal may have led to the deaths dm a building in for eftdville yesterday afternoon. all three men that were found were shot to death. one of the victims has been identified as rallie butler. his mother rented the appropriate at the time that the crime took place. she was not home. there are no suspect ises at this time. we have new information in the death of a millionaire, kumra, investigators are not done yet, ever since the suspects were arrested the attorneys are have complained that prosecutors are n
principle is innovation and technology. when i say italy everybody will think of the arts and music. they don't think of technology yet we want to persuade you there are lots of things to be discovered. i was working in the world of energy and there i think we have taken enormous steps in the direction of a modern sustainable green economy, what we call now distributed generations of people producing and consuming energy. this is happening at an incredible pace in california and i know california like this is and we want to connect with california. some of the events will require the supports of the leaders that are here present, the leaders of the italian american associations. i am very proud to say that all of the leaders of the italian american associations are gathered today, mr. mayor, and senator assembly man and board of supervisors is here to celebrate with us and ramona blackwell who with the committee of the italians abroad and elected body and we will need your support and it's not just top down but bottom up. we're are open to your ideas and suggestions. we want
you can build technology you want, platform you want, that's great. it's the people who are doing it that matter and they're going to get stuff done. this has some of the best people, shannon and jay are doing t. they've been doing it awhile so they know what they're doing. it's great. last year i was building this adopted tree app and i found it on the data portal. it had like some weird geo data like it was in some form i couldn't use. i just dropped jay a note and like within 24 hours i got the data fixed and it was perfect. so, it's those kind of relationships that matter and having the right people in place. so, i think the chief data officer, these guys will end up joining a rock star team. >> not a question, but just a comment to say thanks to the city's innovation office. we're a small company from ireland called building i. we take permit data from cities and show it to anyone who wants to see it. we started off in ireland, discovered the san francisco data and came over here and now we've got an office up and running here with san francisco data. so, it's great to be ab
. impact at bay area airports. the technology in our life. >>jacqueline: heavy weather systems that will move up the east coast. this will strengthen as a result. with a blizzard conditions through the east coast and even through new england. let us take a look at issues towards massachusetts. there is winter weather advisories and warnings. the purple is indicating the blizzard warnings. with nearly 2 ft. of snowfall on a saturday. 1 in. per hour and gusting winds. 25 m.p.h., it is treacherous. taking a look at local conditions the pavement is wet over the golden gate. showers and stormtracker 4 radar showing that activity south of the golden gate. the peninsula, and as we take a look at the satellite and radar with plenty of showers coming in behind these. there rain for overnight and all of this as this quarter drops towards the coast. plenty of shower activity. ken ford to get, near petaluma, hayward, and the peninsula. as we head towards the early morning hours at take a look the snowfall. that is the blue on your screen. 2,500 ft.. a light probable dustin. for the higher
think about what core labs, the company with the technology behind finding so much new oil in old places said last night, last night right here when it detailed its quarter. a quarter that by the way drove the stock up $10.44 to finish today, core told us there could be not one, but two gigantic oil fields in this country we don't even know about, the size of the bakken and eagle ford, the two shales that have made the pipe dream of north american energy self-sufficiency into a reality that we could see in just a couple years time. could you imagine? i think america's oil and gas industry is in the early innings of the second game of the double-header. first game being spindle top. and that's what makes me so hopeful about the rest of the year. beyond just betting history repeats itself. the baltimore-like industrials are beginning to flex their muscles. we've had only one solid quarter from china under our belt. we just jumped over the fiscal cliff in this country. europe just now stabilizing. these recoveries foretell a dramatic increase in orders for our industrials as we saw in the a
and border patrol and technology. "washington journal" is next. ♪ host: congress returns today, part of the agenda includes consideration of a bill requiring the white house to produce a balanced budget. the story today from "the washington times" airlines readers that the budget act requires the president to put out a budget by the first monday of february. senator harry reid said the gun legislation in the senate will include magazine size and background checks, but it would not seek a ban on military-style assault weapons. an amendment could be included to cover that. the president heads to minneapolis to discuss gun control. and the cost of the 2012 elections are in. the final price tag is estimated at $7 billion. according to the consumer confidence index, half the respondents said that the financial crisis went under the labour retirement plan. we are interested in hearing from you if the financial crisis delay your retirement. want to give us a call, the numbers are on your screen. for republicans, 202-585-3881. for democrats, 202-585-3880. for independents, 202-585-3882. if y
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 342 (some duplicates have been removed)

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